ISSF SKEET

ISSF Olympic skeet. Olympic Skeet is a variant of skeet shooting, and the specific variant used in the Olympic Games. Two throwing machines at different heights launch a series of 25 targets in a specific order, some as singles and some as doubles, with the shooter having a fixed position between them.

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AMERICAN SKEET

A round of skeet consists of 25 targets shot on a semi-circular layout with two trap houses, the left being the high house, the right the low house.

There are 8 shooting stations.  One shot only may be fired at each target. Squads consist of 5 shooters, each takes his turn to shoot from a position known as a pad.  These are numbered from 1 to 8.

From each of these stations a single target is released from each house on the call of "pull".  The shooter may have his gun on or off his shoulder as he chooses.

After the competitor has shot his two single targets from stations 1,2, 6 and 7, he remains on the pad and shoots a "double", ie two targets are released simultaneously, one from each house, one shot is fired at each target.

If at any time during a round a competitor misses a target he then reloads one cartridge and repeats the first target that he has missed; however, if he gets to station 8 and has broken all of the 24 previous targets, he then repeats his last target to complete the 25 target round.

SPORTING CLAYS

Sporting Clays is an exciting, relatively new shotgun game that is designed to mimic actual hunting conditions.

 

It is thus both challenging and fun. It uses clay targets similar to those of trap and skeet, but the clay launching machines and course layout differ considerably in order to simulate, as closely as possible, actual field conditions of shooting game birds.

 

The lure of the game 
lies in its difficulty and realism.

CLAY TARGET DISCIPLINES

TRAP (DTL)

American Trap is the most popular shotgun shooting sport, in trapshooting; you shoot clay 
targets thrown from a single trap machine that's situated in the "trap house" in 
front of the shooters.

 

There are five positions on the trap layout itself laid out in an arc behind the trap house.

 

When a round of trap is shot, shooters are usually formed into squads of five shooters. Each shooter takes five shots from 
each of the five positions on the field in succession (moving left to right after each individual shot), for a total of 25 targets.